Tax Justice Blog Attacks Ark Encounter’s Tax Rebates While Accepting Government Largess

It’s been said that “hypocrisy is the tribute liberals pay to reality.” Even more glaring is the blatant hypocrisy by the liberal so-called Citizens for Tax Justice and their basement-based bloggers.

Citizens for Tax Justice is organized as a 501(c)4 — exempt from Federal income tax but allowed to lobby. Citizens for Tax Justice in turn appears to be funded by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, organized as a 501(c)3, which is also exempt from Federal income tax, can accept charitable tax-deductible donations but cannot lobby. Both organizations have the same address on their respective 990 Federal IRS forms. Hhhmmm. Setting up shell organizations to funnel money to their own causes in order to avoid paying taxes? What a sweet deal!

Ok, so why are we making such a big deal about these two liberal activist groups? It seems that Tax Justice blogger, Sebastian Johnson, has written a rambling and snark filled post about how the Ark Encounter “…may lose $18 million in state tax incentives…”

Mr. Johnson, it’s a tax rebate, not a “tax incentive.” Rather than research the actual piece of legislation, the Kentucky Tourism Development Act, he compared the Ark Encounter tax rebate to other states receiving a totally different type of “tax incentive.” (Liberals, and even some conservative and libertarian groups, i.e., the Bluegrass Institute, consider all taxes the same, AND, whether they are good or bad dependent upon on whom is being gored taxed!)

To simplify explaining the Ark Encounter’s tax rebate program, here is the actual wording from the Act:

The incentive for developers of approved new or expanding tourism projects is the ability to recover up to 25% of the project’s development costs over a ten year term. Projects including, but not limited to lodging facilities, that are constructed on state park, federal park and national forest lands are eligible to recover up to fifty percent (50%) of development costs over a twenty year term. An expanding attraction receives the incentive on increased sales tax due to the expansion.

On an annual basis the Kentucky Department of Revenue will return to developers of approved projects the state sales tax paid by visitors to the attraction on admission tickets, food and gift sales and lodging costs.

Mr. Johnson needs to reread the above last paragraph and the additional documentation, specific to the Ark Encounter, which stipulates attendance and revenue numbers before refunds are begun. The state will NOT lose any money if the project fails. The state will STILL collect ALL sales tax when the Ark Encounter opens and does NOT meet the goals as specified by the Tourism Development Act.

Seeing how Mr. Johnson has avoided even a modicum of basic research (Slate.com as an information source?) we can declare clearly and with confidence that the era of post-modernism has completely come to dominate public discourse. Even a Harvard University degree is no guarantee of arriving at the correct facts!

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Wartburg Theological Seminary’s Anti-Creation Program for Continuing Education Credits

Wartburg Theological Seminary, affiliated with the hyper-liberal Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), is offering a series of CE programs for clergy and congregational members known as Come To the Castle. The first class for church members (pastors have a separate track) was held September 26 and covered: “Biblically Challenging Creationism.” Taught by final-year Masters Students this course ran 3 hours over two sessions.

One wonders how “Masters Students” are able to teach on this topic when there are virtually no primary source materials by creationists in their library!

Wartburg
The overwhelming majority of their books on this topic are anti-creationist or theistic evolution. We could only find 6 books by Henry Morris, 1 book by Lee Strobel, 1 intelligent design book, and 1 DVD from the BBC on this topic. No books by Ken Ham, Duane Gish, Andrew Snelling, Russell Humphreys, Steve Austin, Answers in Genesis, Creation Research Society, Institute for Creation Research (except Henry Morris), Creation Ministries International, etc., etc.

What a sad academic environment when Continuing Education classes, run by “final-year Masters Students,” have to rely on 2nd and 3rd hand resources. But, hey, there’s always Wikipedia!

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Acts & Facts, November 2014

aiglibr144Acts & Facts, Vol. 43, No. 11, November 2014, monthly, free. 24 pages.

Executive editor: Jayme Durant.

Institute for Creation Research, PO Box 59029, Dallas, TX 75229. Website.

Table of contents
From the Editor : A Season of Change / Jayme Durant. p. 4.
Unlocking the Times / Henry M. Morris, III. p. 5.
Events : November 2014. p. 8.
BioORIGINS PROJECT UPDATE : Purpose, Progress, and Promise / Nathaniel T. Jeanson. p. 9.
Impact : The Iconic Isochron: Radioactive Dating, Part 2 / Vernon R. Cupps. p. 10.
Back to Genesis : Lungfish Design Is Walking Tall / Brian Thomas. p. 14.
Back to Genesis : Traditions of a Global Flood / John D. Morris. p. 15.
Back to Genesis : Genetic Entropy Points to a Young Earth / Jeffrey Tomkins. p. 16.
Creation Q & A : Do Darwin’s Finches Prove Evolution? / Brian Thomas. p. 17.
Carolus Linnaeus: Founder of Modern Taxonomy / Jerry Bergman. p. 18.
Apologetics : People Yet to Be Created / James J.S. Johnson. p. 20.
Living Missionally / Emily Morris. p. 21.
Stewardship: Countless Blessing / Henry M. Morris, IV. p. 22.
Letters to the Editor. p. 23.

pdf of issue

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Casey Luskin Disparages Creationists…Once Again!

Casey Luskin, a staff member of the Discovery Institute and their Intelligent Design focused Center for Science and Culture, took another backhanded swipe at creationists yesterday morning. It seems that in a rather sad attempt to distance themselves from his roots (yes, ID’ers came out of the creationist movement) Luskin resorts to a bit of historical revision. He quotes from Alister McGrath’s book, Darwinism and the Divine:

Writers linked with the creationist and ‘Intelligent Design’ movements in North America vigorously oppose the teaching of evolution in schools, arguing that ‘Darwinism’ is intrinsically atheistic. (pp. 33-34)

Luskin then goes on to say:

That statement is seriously inaccurate. It might be true of “creationists” in the 1970s and 1980s. However, the ID movement has been very clear in on-the-record statements, including many public policy recommendations, that it does NOT in the least oppose teaching evolution. Discovery Institute is by far the most active ID group that gets involved with evolution-education policy, and we not only oppose mandating ID in public schools, but we think evolution should be taught and that more evolution should be taught.

Should we presume Luskin placed quotes around “creationists” because many of the early ID proponents were part of the creationist movement in the 70s and 80s? For instance, Access Research Network came out of the creationist community. ARN began as the Creation Society of Santa Barbara. It later changed it’s name to Students for Origins Research which eventually became Access Research Network.

Although it would take some time to locate in our VHS collection of old ID videos, there is a talk by Phillip Johnson in which he mentions his “…friends at ICR (Institute for Creation Research)…” We could dig further and find other strong and undeniable connections between the early ID movement and creationist movement of the 70s and 80s. But then again, Casey would continue to deny the historical record.

By the way, we suspect Casey would be hard put to find but a few creationists from that 20 year time period that actually opposed teaching evolution in public schools. The Institute for Creation Research, the Creation Research Society, the Bible-Science Association (now Creation Moments), the Creation Science Foundation (now Answers in Genesis), the Creation Science Movement, and many other groups have never advocated banning evolution. These were all organizations (and many more) that were in existence during the period Casey claims creationists wanted to ban evolution in public schools.

Please do some research before you blather on about creationists. Doesn’t the Discovery Institute use fact checkers for their blog postings???

Hint: Casey, you’ve confused the 70s & 80s with the 20s & 30s and the difference between opposing evolution versus banning evolution!

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P.S. We can conclude that Alister McGrath also doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

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Noah : a Wordless Picture Book by Mark Ludy

aiglibr139Ludy, Mark. Noah : a wordless picture book. Walden, New York: Plough Publishing House, c2014. 64 unnumbered pages. ISBN: 9780874866391, 0874866391.

Mark Ludy’s latest book will appeal to adults and children alike. Digging deeper than the Sunday school tale of cuddly animals on Noah’s ark, the story follows the biblical text and illumines Noah’s relationship with God, his wife, family, nature, and humanity. Ludy’s world-class artwork lets people see, as though for the first time, the beauty within this story – revealing a clearer picture of the nature and character of God and his relationship to humankind. It’s immersive and epic in scale and scope. The wordless format invites conversation and storytelling, key building blocks of literacy. And as with his previous books, Ludy’s signature mouse Squeakers appears hidden on every page.

Mark Ludy’s website

A wonderful example of a beautifully illustrated children’s book about Noah’s Ark and his family. No words or captions! Of particular interest is the nod to modern day creationists in the depiction of a dinosaur and a woolly mammoth used to help construct the Ark. Kudos to Mark Ludy for a job well done!

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